Category Archives: Heritage

Evidencing threats to heritage in conflict zones

Posted on: September 11, 2017 by Emily Gould

“Scientists shoot rocks!” This was the opening line of a fascinating discussion exploring innovative methods of evidencing the destruction of cultural heritage in conflict zones held at the V&A last Friday evening (8 September). The event was part of the V&A’s ‘Culture in Crisis’ programme which seeks to raise awareness of the need to protect […]

Reparations ordered in Timbuktu destruction case

Posted on: August 22, 2017 by Alexander Herman

Last week, the International Criminal Court in the Hague pronounced on the amount in reparations to be paid in last year’s Al Mahdi case. And it was a hefty sum: €2.7 million has been levied against the defendant, Ahmad Al Faqi Al Mahdi, for his role in overseeing the destruction of ten cultural monuments in […]

Report on Conference for Safeguarding Cultural Heritage in Conflict Areas

Posted on: December 9, 2016 by Fionnuala Rogers

“A country is not recognised by its size on the map, but by its culture” Director General of UNESCO Irina Bokova quoted His Highness the late Sheikh Zayed bin Sultan Al Nahyan, former President of the UAE at the International Conference for the Safeguarding of Cultural Heritage in Conflict Areas on 2nd and 3rd December […]

Progress for the Cultural Property (Armed Conflicts) Bill

Posted on: November 2, 2016 by Emily Gould

As promised in our blog post in early July, we wanted to keep you updated on the progress through Parliament of the Cultural Property (Armed Conflicts) Bill, which will enable the UK, finally, to ratify the 1954 Hague Convention. The Bill received its second reading in the House of Commons this week (31st October). It […]

Old Flo is staying put – what can we learn?

Posted on: June 7, 2016 by Emily Gould

It was interesting to see that the judgment in the important ‘Old Flo’ case on which we reported in July 2015 has now been upheld by the Court of Appeal. You might recall the story. Old Flo – or Draped Seated Woman, to give Henry Moore’s 1,500 kg bronze figure her proper title – was […]

Art law talk at Chancery Bar Association

Posted on: May 25, 2016 by Alexander Herman

An interesting talk was held last night by the Chancery Bar Association in London on the topic of art law. And it was an esteemed panel that considered the topic from a variety of angles. Lord Justice Geoffrey Vos, judge at the Court of Appeal, introduced the proceedings by querying the term ‘art law’ itself, noting that […]

Conviction at last under 2003 Act

Posted on: May 11, 2016 by Alexander Herman

An important piece of legislation, brought into force around the time of the UK’s accession to the UNESCO 1970 Convention in 2002, has at last been used as the basis for a conviction. The statute, the Dealing in Cultural Objects (Offences) Act 2003, sets out an offence for dishonestly dealing in tainted cultural objects. The term ‘tainted’ for […]

Report on APPG Cultural Heritage meeting

Posted on: April 19, 2016 by Alexander Herman

Yesterday, IAL Senior Researcher Emily Gould and I were fortunate enough to be invited by Historic England‘s Mark Harrison to the All-Party Parliamentary Group (APPG) for the Protection of Cultural Heritage meeting at the Palace of Westminster. This is the group launched last November, one of the priorities of which is to lobby within the UK […]

Conference in London on Valuation of Museum Collections

Posted on: March 25, 2016 by Emily Gould

Those in the museum sector may be interested in attending a forthcoming event at the Natural History Museum on the financial valuation of museum collections. The conference will take place on 22 April 2016 and is called For what it’s worth: Essentials of collections valuation. The wide-ranging programme looks both fascinating and highly practical, covering […]

Up your street: a new perspective on street art?

Posted on: February 19, 2016 by Emily Gould

We tend to think of street art as highly contemporary – edgy, modern and up to the minute in its commentary on the social and political controversies of the day. But what about cave paintings, medieval etchings, scrawls on the walls of the ancient city of Pompeii? The once-widespread notion that graffiti and street art […]